Our theme members work to build new educational experiences and examine how well they work for students and academics.

Our research projects use a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the development, implementation, stakeholder experience and outcomes of educational activities.

Working directly with educators, employers and other students at UQ and further afield, our research students:

  • conduct surveys and interviews
  • examine student outputs
  • analyse feedback from multiple sources
  • work directly on creative teaching media such as online learning tools, video productions, student magazines, radio programs and podcasts.

Theme members also collaborate with other academics in local, national and international contexts to evaluate and improve educational practice.

Theme leader: Professor Susan Rowland

 

Theme members

Professor Ross Barnard Infectious diseases, molecular biology and biotechnology

Associate Professor Mikael Boden Bioinformatics (analysis, modelling and integration of biological data)

Professor Melissa Brown Molecular genetics and biology of breast cancer

Associate Professor Jack Clegg Metallo-supramolecular chemistry

Professor Elizabeth Gillam Biocatalysis and Molecular Toxicology

Associate Professor Lisbeth Grondahl Biomaterials for bone repair and regeneration

Professor Roy Hall Vector-borne viruses; structure/function of viral proteins; viral vaccines and diagnostics; virus discovery

Associate Professor Ulrike Kappler Microbial physiology and biochemistry of metalloenzymes

Associate Professor Stuart Kellie Signalling molecules in macrophages and tumour cells

Associate Professor Ross McGeary Synthesis, methodology, and medicinal chemistry

Professor Peter O'Donoghue Clinical protozoology

Professor Mark Schembri Bacterial Pathogenesis

Professor Gary Schenk Physical Chemistry - Structure, function, mechanism and pharmaceutical potential of metalloenzymes

Dr Anitha Sudheesh Kumar Nano drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins and anticancer drugs

Professor Paul Young Molecular virology